Solutions

SOLUTIONS you’ve been promised, and solutions you shall have.

 

 

 

REMEMBER the Millennium Development Goals? In the year 2000 the United Nations orchestrated international, inter-governmental agreement on eight overarching Development Goals – to be reached by 2015.

ERADICATE EXTREME POVERTY AND HUNGERACHIEVE UNIVERSAL PRIMARY EDUCATIONPROMOTE GENDER EQUALITY AND EMPOWER WOMENREDUCE CHILD MORTALITY

IMPROVE MATERNAL HEALTHCOMBAT HIV/AIDS, MALARIA AND OTHER DISEASESENSURE ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITYDEVELOP A GLOBAL PARTNERSHIP FOR DEVELOPMENT

 

There is good news to report: the world has made very significant progress towards reaching these goals, as the UN reported under the ‘We can end Poverty’ banner.

 

THIS begs the question, of course, ‘what next?’

The culmination of what has been described as the UN’s broadest, most inclusive process of discussion and debate, the world is inching towards agreeing a set of 17 Sustainable Development Goals.

In December 2014, the UN’s Secretary-General published his ‘synthesis report’, under the title: ‘The road to dignity by 2030: ending poverty, transforming all lives and protecting the planet‘.

The 17 Goals are supported by specific targets. Further work continues to ensure each goal and every target is agreed internationally.
As for me – you had me at ‘End Poverty in All its forms Everywhere’!

 

A QUICK guide to the Capital, through a statistical lens, Edinburgh by Numbers brings together key information from a range of local, Scottish, and UK-wide sources that, taken together paint a rich picture of life in the city.

From census statistics from the Office for National Statistics, to key Scottish Household Survey numbers, to local resource the Edinburgh People Survey, this handy publication brings key findings together – fully annotated – for you to use in your own publications.

Have a quick skim, or spend time comparing stats from Edinburgh against other comparator UK cities, you’ll find it is time well spent.

 

WANT to know more about ‘your place’? Visit the fantastic resource USP for info on where you live, work, study or play – or even a place you might want to move to.

What’s the average distance travelled to work? the number of children in primary schools? even the number of charities? Ask USP.

Ever wondered which places in Scotland are most similar to ‘your’ place? How it compares on deprivation, diversity of employment sector, even the number of residents per charity? Ask USP.

Need a quick, reliable source of information on just how the researchers categorised places, identified relationships and inter-relationships, even defined place itself? Ask USP.

Commissioned by the Scottish Government, and built by a consortium led by the Carnegie UK Trust including Scotland’s Towns Partnership (STP), the Centre for Local Economic Strategies (CLES), and the University of Stirling, this resource was published at the end of April 2015 for use by anyone with an interest in credible, usable and useful data on Understainding Scottish Places.

If data are your thing, this is a credible new resource that’s bound to become another tool in the toolkit used by planners, strategists, service designers and members of the general public.

Get to know ‘your place’ – and share your insights with everyone.

 

NOT long out, and certainly making waves, is the excellent resource on CoProduction put together by the fab folk at the Scottish Co-production Network, the Joint Improvement Team, The Health & Social Care Alliance Scotland and Governance International.

Each one of these sites hosts a range of other resources you are bound to find of interest, but today I want to extol the excellences of the resource called ‘CoProduction – how we make a difference together‘.

Packed with invaluable policy insights, practical tools you can use, and case studies, I hope that the resource becomes something you can refer to every day – as we make our journey towards building Scotland to be the CoProduction Capital of the World.

The team I led at EVOC is particularly pleased about the case study of Canny wi’ Cash – a Participatory Budgeting exemplar. You might find the Canny wi’ Cash graphic novel a quick introduction to the project. Please do take a look. I’d be happy to hear what you think of it. And if I can help answer any questions, don’t hesitate to get in touch.

 

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